Next: Other Window, Previous: Basic Window, Up: Windows   [Contents][Index]


20.2 Splitting Windows

C-x 2
Split the selected window into two windows, one above the other (split-window-below).
C-x 3
Split the selected window into two windows, positioned side by side (split-window-right).
C-mouse-2
In the mode line of a window, split that window.

C-x 2 (split-window-below) splits the selected window into two windows, one above the other. After splitting, the selected window is the upper one, and the newly split-off window is below. Both windows have the same value of point as before, and display the same portion of the buffer (or as close to it as possible). If necessary, the windows are scrolled to keep point on-screen. By default, the two windows each get half the height of the original window. A positive numeric argument specifies how many lines to give to the top window; a negative numeric argument specifies how many lines to give to the bottom window.

If you change the variable split-window-keep-point to nil, C-x 2 instead adjusts the portion of the buffer displayed by the two windows, as well as the value of point in each window, in order to keep the text on the screen as close as possible to what it was before; furthermore, if point was in the lower half of the original window, the bottom window is selected instead of the upper one.

C-x 3 (split-window-right) splits the selected window into two side-by-side windows. The left window is the selected one; the right window displays the same portion of the same buffer, and has the same value of point. A positive numeric argument specifies how many columns to give the left window; a negative numeric argument specifies how many columns to give the right window.

When you split a window with C-x 3, each resulting window occupies less than the full width of the frame. If it becomes too narrow, the buffer may be difficult to read if continuation lines are in use (see Continuation Lines). Therefore, Emacs automatically switches to line truncation if the window width becomes narrower than 50 columns. This truncation occurs regardless of the value of the variable truncate-lines (see Line Truncation); it is instead controlled by the variable truncate-partial-width-windows. If the value of this variable is a positive integer (the default is 50), that specifies the minimum total width for a partial-width window before automatic line truncation occurs; if the value is nil, automatic line truncation is disabled; and for any other non-nil value, Emacs truncates lines in every partial-width window regardless of its width. The total width of a window is in column units as reported by window-total-width (see Window Sizes in The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual), it includes the fringes, the continuation and truncation glyphs, the margins, and the scroll bar.

On text terminals, side-by-side windows are separated by a vertical divider which is drawn using the vertical-border face.

If you click C-mouse-2 in the mode line of a window, that splits the window, putting a vertical divider where you click. Depending on how Emacs is compiled, you can also split a window by clicking C-mouse-2 in the scroll bar, which puts a horizontal divider where you click (this feature does not work when Emacs uses GTK+ scroll bars).

By default, when you split a window, Emacs gives each of the resulting windows dimensions that are an integral multiple of the default font size of the frame. That might subdivide the screen estate unevenly between the resulting windows. If you set the variable window-resize-pixelwise to a non-nil value, Emacs will give each window the same number of pixels (give or take one pixel if the initial dimension was an odd number of pixels). Note that when a frame’s pixel size is not a multiple of the frame’s character size, at least one window may get resized pixelwise even if this option is nil.

Next: Other Window, Previous: Basic Window, Up: Windows   [Contents][Index]