Next: Yanking, Up: Killing   [Contents][Index]


12.1 Deletion and Killing

Most commands which erase text from the buffer save it in the kill ring (see Kill Ring). These are known as kill commands, and their names normally contain the word ‘kill’ (e.g., kill-line). The kill ring stores several recent kills, not just the last one, so killing is a very safe operation: you don’t have to worry much about losing text that you previously killed. The kill ring is shared by all buffers, so text that is killed in one buffer can be yanked into another buffer.

When you use C-/ (undo) to undo a kill command (see Undo), that brings the killed text back into the buffer, but does not remove it from the kill ring.

On graphical displays, killing text also copies it to the system clipboard. See Cut and Paste.

Commands that erase text but do not save it in the kill ring are known as delete commands; their names usually contain the word ‘delete’. These include C-d (delete-char) and DEL (delete-backward-char), which delete only one character at a time, and those commands that delete only spaces or newlines. Commands that can erase significant amounts of nontrivial data generally do a kill operation instead.

You can also use the mouse to kill and yank. See Cut and Paste.

Deletion:    Commands for deleting small amounts of text and

blank areas.

Killing by Lines:    How to kill entire lines of text at one time.
Other Kill Commands:    Commands to kill large regions of text and

syntactic units such as words and sentences.

Kill Options:    Options that affect killing.

Next: Yanking, Up: Killing   [Contents][Index]